The Future of Electromobility and EV Infrastructure in the EU

The European Parliament has published a Navigant Research study on EV charging infrastructure in the EU

The European Parliament has published a Navigant study on EV charging infrastructure requested by the Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN).

The report, Research for TRAN Committee - Charging infrastructure for electric road vehicles, analyzes various challenges regarding the deployment of charging infrastructure within the EU, including existing technologies and standardization issues, metering systems and pricing schemes, business and financing models, the impact of charging infrastructure on the dissemination of PEVs, specifically in relation to charging points for electric cars, vans, buses, and bikes.

“The objective is to highlight the key issues likely to be of concern to the Members of the European Parliament's Committee on TRAN and to indicate possible actions that might be taken by the Committee,” writes Navigant researchers. “This study also serves as input for the revision of Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive.”

This transition to low carbon transport is a key target for the EU’s current energy and climate policies, which set a 60% reduction of transportation carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions based on 1990 by 2050. According to the report, Electromobility is seen as the most promising technology to reduce C02 emissions and reach EU Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reduction targets, as well as the goals set in the Paris Agreement. Electromobility refers to the use of EVs as a key element in these efforts to reach EU GHG reduction targets. According to the report, additional advantages to this transition includes the increase of energy efficiency in transportation and the reduction of smog and noise.

 Key findings in the report include: 

  • The transition to low carbon transport is one of the key targets of the European Union’s (EU) current energy and climate policies. The EU set the target that by 2050, emissions from transport (excluding international waterborne transport) must be 60% lower than they were in 1990 and the EU must firmly be on the path towards full decarbonization.
  • The development of electromobility in the EU, with the exceptions of a few frontrunner countries, has been rather slow.
  • The total share of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) when compared to the total stock of passenger cars was only around 0.3% in 2017 in the EU. Nevertheless, the PEV passenger car market share of new registrations has increased over the past five years, and so has the total stock of PEVs.
  • In the EU, the recharging infrastructure development is scattered and mainly coordinated at regional level. There are no explicit targets related to charging infrastructure at EU level, but rather a multitude of supporting measures.
  • In addition to the lack of charging stations, there are different standards concerning the connector and rated power needed on the charger and vehicle side, as well as various payment methods.
  • The Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) passenger car market share of new registrations has increased over the past five years, and so has the total stock of PEVs.
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